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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: Everybody Dreaming Together in Agnes Varda’s Mur Murs

I recently returned from a short holiday to Spain, where – apart from reminding myself that the sun did in fact exist – I was introduced to the amazing murals of Estapona; a small resort town two hours west of Malaga on the south coast. The huge arts initiative, which invited painters from all over […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: Foxes (Adrian Lyne, 1980)

It was purely by accident that I was recommended a film the other day which featured the actress Sally Kellerman who sadly passed away on the 24th February at the age of 84. The film was Adrian Lyne’s Foxes (1980), starring Jodie Foster as 15 year old tearaway Jeanie juggling the unfair demands of adulthood […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: The People Under the Stairs (Wes Craven, 1991)

“You can understand why someone would rob a house if they’re broke, but to rob…children of their lives [is] far more insidious…” Wes Craven states in his director’s commentary for the  R-rated 1991 film, The People Under the Stairs. Loosely based on a true occurrence, Craven’s “horror noire” examines the irony of its Mother (Wendy […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: The Comic (Carl Reiner, 1969)

Comedian and director Carl Reiner’s second directorial feature-length film, The Comic (1969), starred Dick Van Dyke as a fictitious silent film era comedian, Billy Bright. Bright, an over bearing, egocentric comic, never reached the level of fame he believed he should have, always falling victim to the behavior of others like his wife (and co-star) […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)

Ridley Scott’s fascination with omniscience goes to the outer limits in his 2012 science fiction film, Prometheus (2012). Often assumed a prequel to Alien (1979), Prometheus focuses on discovering mankind’s “engineers,” while amalgamating concepts of heroes and villains. Scott’s unsurpassable directing techniques are shown through the tiniest features in his characters. Even the unsettling soundtrack brings […]

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Feature Lost Classic

Cube: An Endless Existentialist Escape

Weaving horror techniques with philosophical undertones, Cube (1997) navigates the dark recesses of humanity in a mechanical enigma. In a bright start for his career, Vincenzo Natali co-wrote and directed the movie while still a student in film school. It is perhaps due to this creative freedom – and a low budget – that a […]

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Feature Lost Classic

The beauty of free movement: Akira Kurosawa’s Uma no uta

In his autobiography, Something Like an Autobiography, Akira Kurosawa mentions that since his youth he had loved horses and had spent whole afternoons at the hippodrome in Meguro. One of his screenplays written in the early 1940s was called Jajauma monogatari (The Story of a Bad Horse). This project was never realized, but Uma no […]

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Feature Lost Classic

Fighting Social Ills: Akira Kurosawa’s Red Beard

In Akira Kurosawa’s Red Beard (Akahige, 1965), Dr. Niide (Toshiro Mifune), called “Red Beard”, offers medical treatment cheaply or for free in Edo (as Tokyo was formerly called) in the first half of the 19th century. The nickname Red Beard hints at “red medicine” (komo i gaku), designating the treatment practised by the Dutch (the […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: Taylor Sheridan’s Wind River

Taylor Sheridan’s Wind River (2017) pitches us into an unforgiving wintry environment and declares once and for all, as if we didn’t know already, that this writer-director will be a survivor. And yes, his movie grips and informs and entertains along the way. A female, big-city-loneliness FBI agent finds herself tracking a rapist and murderer, his […]