Categories
Lost Classics Reviews

Lost Classic: Sorcerer (William Friedkin, 1977)

Unwittingly foreshadowing the fate of its four displaced protagonists, William Friedkin’s existential follow-up to The Exorcist was doomed the moment a certain lightsaber-rattling space opera arrived in cinemas from a galaxy far, far away. Sorcerer (1977) has been cited by some as the beginning of the end for the New Hollywood movement. However, a giant […]

Categories
Features Screengems Thousand Words

Parting Shots: Deers in films

There is something elusive and majestic about deers that film directors seem unable to ignore. These beautiful animals have appeared in movies covering a wide range of genres, and whilst their fleeting appearances often only add up to a few seconds of screen time their impact is usually integral to the filmmaker’s vision. Take the […]

Categories
Features Four Frames

Four Frames: The Innocents (Jack Clayton, 1961)

The Innocents – Jack Clayton’s adaptation of Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw – was once described by the famous New Yorker magazine film critic Pauline Kael as “the best ghost movie I’ve ever seen”. Miss Giddens, a brittle and idealistic young governess, is newly employed as custodian of two orphaned children, Miles and […]

Categories
Features Four Frames

Four Frames: Tragic spectacle in Rust and Bone (Jacques Audiard, 2012)

The pivotal narrative moment in Jacques Audiard’s Rust And Bone (2012) is an accident involving a killer whale that sees one of the film’s protagonists, Marion Cotillard’s whale trainer Stéphanie, lose her legs. The sequence clearly poses a test for the filmmaker. Should one render the act using CGI, or retain rawness and attempt to convey […]

Categories
Features Thousand Words Widescreen

On Location: Maine in Nor’easter (Andrew Brotzman, 2013)

Where a film is set is not always integral to the movie, unless it’s a Sci-Fi. Try setting Aliens or Moon on a council estate in Clapham and see where it gets you. But something like Midnight In Paris, for example, could be Midnight In Anywhere. It’s nice that it’s Paris, and it helps with […]

Categories
Features Screengems

Screengems: The Red Barn in My Own Private Idaho (Gus Van Sant, 1991)

First of all, there is still an Art House in Champaign, IL. When I saw My Own Private Idaho there in 1991 it had been called the “New Art” theater since around ‘87, when it was resurrected from its seedy past as a 70’s porn venue. The theater has been in existence since the early […]

Categories
Features Thousand Words Widescreen

Architecture and Film #11 Master Shot

The historical epic dates from the earliest days of cinema, with Intolerance and Ben-Hur setting not only the desired level of visual splendour (with budget to match) but also the preferred period. The recreated glories of ancient Rome and Egypt have dominated the genre ever since, although this obscures some notable explorations of other times […]

Categories
Features Four Frames

Four Frames: La vie de Jésus (Bruno Dumont, 1997)

For most of La vie de Jésus Bruno Dumont has his audience riding pinion with a gang of bored young motorcyclists. They roam aimlessly around a widescreen rendered, rural northeastern France, waiting for their lives to happen, or for someone to merely notice they are there. However, a potentially racist act of violence towards the […]