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Features Four Frames

Four Frames: revisiting The Game, David Fincher’s under the radar thriller

The Game is a film about awareness and relationships, with Nicholas Van Orton (Michael Douglas), a wealthy businessman protagonist who keeps the world at a considered distance. Van Orton reduces almost all relationships to services – an that fits the capitalist economy in which he operates. His world is constructed of near-hermetically sealed spheres: the private […]

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Features Thousand Words Widescreen

Spotlight: What’s Your Favourite Scary Movie?

What’s Your Favourite Scary Movie? Here at The Big Picture HQ, we thought it would be fun to ask some of our regular contributors what their top ten favourite horror movies are. Do you agree with our writers’ choices? Mark Fletcher Horror has been a staple part of my movie watching since I was a […]

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Features Four Frames

Four Frames: 28 Days Later (Danny Boyle, 2002)

The zombie film was, to excuse the pun, a sub-genre that had flatlined at the turn of the century. Movies thrown together by hacks with low budgets and even lower ambitions had consigned the undead to the DVD shelves. What this sub-section of horror needed was an injection of life, and British genre-spanning director Danny […]

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Features Thousand Words Widescreen

On Location: Maine in Nor’easter (Andrew Brotzman, 2013)

Where a film is set is not always integral to the movie, unless it’s a Sci-Fi. Try setting Aliens or Moon on a council estate in Clapham and see where it gets you. But something like Midnight In Paris, for example, could be Midnight In Anywhere. It’s nice that it’s Paris, and it helps with […]

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Features Screengems

Screengems: The Red Barn in My Own Private Idaho (Gus Van Sant, 1991)

First of all, there is still an Art House in Champaign, IL. When I saw My Own Private Idaho there in 1991 it had been called the “New Art” theater since around ‘87, when it was resurrected from its seedy past as a 70’s porn venue. The theater has been in existence since the early […]

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Features Thousand Words Widescreen

On Location: The rain in London as featured in ‘Husbands’ (Dir. John Cassavetes, 1970)

Gus (John Cassavetes) and Mary (Jenny Runacre) jump out of a black London cab and into the sanctuary of Henry’s Soup Kitchen, a non-descript café, Gus pausing momentarily to throw the fare through the cab window, desperate that the incessant rain doesn’t touch him. The pair have spent the night together, sharing a complicated, fleeting […]

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Features Four Frames

Four Frames: Shelley Winters and water don’t mix: The Night of the Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)

It probably wasn’t planned this way but it’s really quite remarkable how often the film characters played by actress Shelley Winters met a watery grave. One of her most hauntingly bizarre demises features in Charles Laughton’s lone directorial outing The Night of the Hunter. To silence his new wife Willa (Winters) evil Reverend Harry Powell […]

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Features Thousand Words Widescreen

On Location: Hell Gate Bridge, New York as seen in Serpico (Dir.Sidney Lumet, 1973)

Continuing our tie-in series of articles to celebrate the launch of the World Film Locations book series in July – and as a tribute to director Sidney Lumet who sadly passed away on April 8th – we look at how New York’s Hell Gate Bridge (which connects Queens, the Bronx and Manhattan), provided the perfect […]