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Feature

Dark Portraits: The photographs of Amanda Norman (part 2)

In part two of their interview, Scott Jordan Harris talks to Amanda Norman about horror photography, her less obvious influences and why she doesn’t make movies. Many of your main influences are immediately obvious from your work, but I suspect some are not. In part one of this interview, we talked about the effect on […]

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Feature

Getting closer: Overuse of the photo-zoom clue in movies

We’re all detectives now, thanks to today’s photo and video technology. We can all isolate single frames of footage, blow them up, enhance them and present them as evidence of something or nothing from the comfort of our laptops for the edification of who knows who on the web. And the filmmakers know that. Boy, […]

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Feature

First Person: Heather Millard and Iceland: Future Of Hope (part 2)

The continuation of an interview with Heather Millard, producer of Iceland: Future Of Hope. Do you get a sense that Iceland’s filmmakers have a role to play in pulling the country back from the brink? We strongly believe that Iceland’s filmmakers can play a strong role in re-building Iceland’s economy not only through potential income […]

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Feature

First Person: Heather Millard and Iceland: Future Of Hope

Imagine trying to fund and make a film in a country synonymous in the Press with the global economic crisis. Heather Millard, producer of the Iceland: Future Of Hope project tells Jez Conolly about the inspiration for the film and the highs and lows that the production team have encountered. What’s the history of the […]

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Feature Thousand Words

Thousand Words: Go-Motion animation: it was all just a blur

I can’t help thinking that, for anyone born in the 1980s and subsequently raised exclusively on a diet of post-Jurassic Park creature realisation, the cinematic work of stop-motion maestro Ray Harryhausen must seem as archaic as Victorian magic lantern shows. What then would they make of Go-Motion, the near-forgotten transitional fossil of animation techniques that […]

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Feature Thousand Words

Popcorn and politics: the favourite movies of our glorious leaders

Moats and duck islands aside, we’ve grown used to the personal tastes of our political lords and masters ostensibly being determined for public consumption by focus groups so as to iron out any possible idiosyncratic and potentially unpopular cultural choice that they might actually make. But when it comes to film what has really had […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: The System (Michael Winner 1964)

Hard though it is to believe, long before the lurid excesses of his Death Wish franchise, the bloated self-satisfaction of his Times restaurant reviews and the irritating ubiquity of his esure adverts, Michael Winner actually made films worth sitting through. One of them was released for the first time on DVD last year and is an […]

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Lost Classic Reviews

Lost Classic: Seven Days To Noon (John and Roy Boulting 1950)

Released last year for the first time on DVD, the Boulting brothers’ Seven Days to Noon is nearly sixty years old now but seems more relevant and frightening than ever. As well as working as an entertaining thriller it offers an interesting insight into how people might have dealt with the ultimate threat of annihilation […]

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Feature

Really most sincerely dead?: the myth of the hanging Munchkin

As urban myths go, the one about the suicidal Munchkin, supposedly visible dangling from a tree as Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man meander down the yellow brick road in The Wizard Of Oz is fairly easily debunked, as any cursory study of the clip on youtube will attest. But does the myth say something about the viewing […]